Fort Benning Gateway Bridge

Location:

Columbus, GA
 

Year:

2011
 

Owner:

Columbus Consolidated Government, Columbus, GA
 

Architect:

Jenkins Architecture, Columbus, GA
 

Structural Engineer:

Wright Engineering, LLC, Columbus, GA
 

Contractor:

Archer Western Contractors, Atlanta, GA
 

Developer:

Gateway Foundation, Columbus, GA
 

Project Scope

Sq. Footage:

30,439 sf (architectural precast)
 

Architectural Precast Elements:

• 238 pieces
 

Awards:

First Place Award –
"Best Public Works for Fort Benning Gateway",
ACI (America Concrete Institute) Georgia Chapter
 

Resources

 
 
 
 
 
 
Fort Benning Gateway Bridge
Fort Benning Gateway Bridge
Fort Benning Gateway Bridge
Fort Benning Gateway Bridge
Fort Benning Gateway Bridge
Fort Benning Gateway Bridge
Fort Benning Gateway Bridge
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Design Challenge:
Officials at Fort Benning in Columbus, Georgia, wanted to project a more dramatic face for visitors to the fort, one of the Army’s busiest, and combine the highly finished aesthetic design with a structural concept that would allow the sculptural elements—essentially narrow bridges in their own right—to provide an integrated solution.

Design Solution:
Designers created freestanding precast concrete facades which flank the existing steel-span bridge and added round precast concrete columns at each corner, topped with an imposing statue which was accomplished by precaster Metromont Corp. in Hiram, Georgia.

The $6.8-million design features column piers on each end with a supporting pier in the highway median below. The spans over the highway were created as two panels, each approximately 89 ft long weighing 100,000 lbs. The panels have metal lettering attached to them to spell “Fort Benning Georgia” on the north facade and “Columbus, Georgia” on the south facade.

The structures’ finish consists of a white/buff mix of aggregates with a moderate sandblast. A total of 238 pieces, comprising 30,439 sq ft of architectural precast. were erected using a crane positioned on each side of the interstate lanes to erect the spandrels. Traffic only needed to be stopped for the short time when a panel was being set over the highway.

The erector also placed the four 50-ft-tall towering piers which each support four tall, round precast columns topped with a precast concrete column cap. Bronze statues were placed atop the pillars by the precast erector. Two feature American bald eagles, while the others showcase statues representing the Armor and Infantry schools that train at the base.

 
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